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Minor problems stacking up

It seems to happen too often to me. I’m ending up with many different small, minor problems, sometimes not big deals taken alone. But when they sum up, this becomes unbearable, resulting into a bad and exhausting day. Sometimes, the solutions are simple, sometimes not. Here is the most recent stack of such issues.

Spending my time importing modules in Python

For the moment, the only way I have to edit my Python code running on a remote virtual machine is to use Emacs running from that machine. I’m investigating local solutions, but this is just a non-sense chain of complications or requires software free for commercial use that I cannot adopt at work.

One operation that ends up to be frequent is to import a module. You are writing a piece of code and then need to call into a function defined in another module or in the standard Python library.  When this happens, I need to add an instruction to import the module if it is not yet from my current module. Import constructions can appear anywhere in the code, but convention puts the instructions at the beginning of the files. This seems better for code organization and ensures that all imports happen at start of the program rather than at any time during the execution. If a module imported at top of the file is missing, the code will fail fast, as opposed to fail only when a function importing a module is called.

As a result, I am sometimes editing code and need to step at start of file to add an import, then find back where I am and continue. This small interruption in task flow is not a big deal in itself but it becomes more and more painful when it repeats itself tens of times a day, sometimes at each and every successive line of code!

Maybe I went too granular and split my code in too many modules. Am I in a situation where it would be better to have one single huge file with a lot of stuff, rather than splitting my code in multiple files? Well, last Monday, I was at the point of wondering that.

How did I work this out before? When I was programming in Java, I was using Eclipse as my IDE. This program is able to guess the import statements from referred class names and automatically add them at the beginning of the files, without having me go there, loose my position and come back. Probably a Python IDE such as PyDev or PyCharms would do it, but I cannot use them for the moment.

Fortunately, I came up with a very simple trick. In GNU Emacs, you can split the window in two parts by using C-x 2. Both windows first point at the same part of the current buffer, but it is perfectly possible to move the cursor up. This changes the position of the current window, while leaving the cursor unchanged in the second window. I can then add my import statements, switch to the window with original cursor using C-x o, then make it the only window with C-x 1. Something similar can be done using bookmarks, but this requires other keyboard shortcuts harder to remember and each bookmark needs to be named while sometimes they are one-off save/restore scenarios.

Keyboard shortcut confusion

Since I gave up on Virtuawin because its behavior was too inconsistent on Windows 8, I ended up using Desktops from SysInternals which uses different keyboard shortcut than Ubuntu for switching desktops. I thought CTRL-ALT-F1 to F4 would be nice keys, but this ends up being a nightmare. As soon as I came back to Ubuntu after one week working with Desktops, I was screwed up, always making the same mistake of pressing CTRL-ALT-F1, which switched to the console. I then had to press CTRL-ALT-F7 to go back to X. This also happens in VirtualBox virtual machines.

There is no perfect solution for this. My current workaround is to use CTRL-F1 through F4 instead. At least, if I press that in Ubuntu, nothing happens, as opposed to wiping my screen away and forcing me to press CTRL-ALT-F7.

Windows 8 becoming increasingly disturbing

Even Desktops starts to be a nuisance because of Windows 8. As soon as I am on desktops 2, 3 or 4, I need to be careful not to press on the Windows key. If I do it, which I am used to, this switches to Metro which of course replaces my screen with the home screen. Then I am back to desktop 1. Metro is my most common way of starting applications on Windows 8: press Windows key, type a name, press enter. This also works great on Windows 7 and Ubuntu’s Unity.  But this fails with Desktops on Windows 8. There is no way out, other than putting EVERY application on the desktop and spending more than 30 seconds each time I want to start something! I just cannot do that, this is too inefficient, especially knowing that it will take half the time to find out the icons for a sighted person than for me with a visual impairment. I could work around by grouping the icons in some clever way, creating folders, but this remains clunky.

Windows 8 is also causing issues with Lync, the instant messaging software my company is using. Lync works correctly in text mode, but it intermittently fails for voice chat and screen sharing. When this happens, it consistently displays a network error, no matter how hard we try to establish the communication. We have to fall back on alternative ways, like traditional phone. The only solution has been to reinstall Lync.

IT people at my company were of no help. They would have liked me to try out Lync on Windows 8 in the office rather than finding what is going on. However,the Windows 8 ultrabook my company lent me is almost unusable for me unless I hook it to an external monitor and mouse. At the office, I don’t have an HDMI input I could use to plug my mini DisplayPort to HDMI adapter I use at home, and the mini DisplayPort to VGA adapter that could have worked went away a couple of months ago. Somebody borrowed it and never brought it back. Even if I had the adapter, performing this test would be tedious. I would have to wait for a voice chat and when it happens, quickly switch from my regular laptop to the ultrabook and try. This is just non sense stress that may just give no result: it will probably work correctly, showing that the problem comes from VPN, my router, etc.

There is no way out, other than running away from Windows 8. I thus stopped using the ultrabook, at least for the moment, and used the official laptop instead. That machines runs the good old Windows 7 OS. If Lync starts failing with that as well, then I will have to switch routers, try on somebody else’s Internet connection, etc.

SSH connection timing out for no reason

We recently switched from outdated Cisco’s IPSec VPN client to newer SSL-based AnyConnect. This seemed to go smooth, after I uninstalled and reinstalled VirtualBox (seems VirtualBox is interfering with Cisco’s VPN). However, I noticed that SSH started to time out at me when I wasn’t interacting with the shell for a moment. This was forcing me to reconnect, restart what I was working on, sometimes switching to a directory with a long path, sometimes Bash history was working, sometimes not.

My first attempt at working around unreliable connections was to make use of EmacsClient. For this, I started Emacs with the -daemon option, then used emacsclient instead of emacs. That works surprisingly well. With that, Emacs keeps running on the server and doesn’t loose track of unsaved files if connection drops. Of course, I keep the good habit of saving often, which is an additional elementary safety against unreliable connections.

Yesterday, I may have found out a way to get rid of these timeouts. My current hypothesis is that the new VPN client monitors the TCP connections going through the tunnel it establishes and shuts them off if they are inactive. Fortunately, SSH provides a way to keep connections alive: the ServerAliveInterval configuration option. By putting ServerAliveInterval 60 in my .ssh/config for my virtual machine, I am forcing SSH to send a TCP packet every 60 seconds so nor SSH server, nor VPN client, have a reason to kill the connection. This seems to help, but this is not fully tested yet.

The mouse making me mad!

Why does my Razor mouse was so jumpy? I feel I have less problem at the office than at home with the mouse? Will I really need to get myself a Dell mouse like the one I have at the office?  Is it because I am running crazy? Maybe not! I found out this week that my mouse pad is pretty suspect: it has multiple scratches on it that can well screw up the optical-based mouse tracking, and the surface has some patterns. I remember when I worked at my parents’ home having hard time with the mouse. That ended up to be because of the desk! Putting the mouse on top of a piece of white paper, yes, just a plain old piece of paper, nothing more sophisticated, cleared the issue! So I removed that mouse pad and that seemed to help! It is unbelievable how sometimes, simple solutions, almost non-sense stupid ones, can lead us far!